Low-tech solutions for daily life

There are many low-tech and affordable devices can help persons with disabilities improve their independence. The following are a few examples of low-tech options, which can be helpful for persons with mobility and lower body challenges in daily activities such as getting up and down from a sitting position, moving your legs, putting socks, etc.
If you have elderly or family members who have difficulty to get up from a sofa because of their age or  a surgery (i.e. Achilles tendon repair), the assistive device like Able Life Universal Stand may allow them to stand up independently. According to its specification, it supports the weight of up to 300 lbs., and it comes with height adjustable legs and handles. It is supplied with an assist bar to stand easily from most couches, chairs, or recliners. Able Life Universal Stand costs around $79, considerably less than an expensive lift chair.

Universal Stand Assist – Able Life
(YouTube video by Able Life)

A Leg Lifter strap can help persons who are recovering from leg or hip surgery or suffering from arthritis. This low-tech device helps the person’s affected leg be maneuvered into place and safely re-positioned.

How to Get Out of Bed Easier Using a Leg Lifter
(YouTube video by Adaptive Equipment Corner)

Other leg lifter straps
https://www.vivehealth.com/blogs/resources/leg-lifter-strap

The Sock Assist Device is another low-tech option to help persons who are recovering from surgery such as knee replacement or those with limited mobility. Those who have difficulty reaching toes and putting on socks have found this device to be very useful. Some people have found it difficult to follow the instructions or the size may be too large. However, as it only costs around $10 – $20, it is probably worth a trial.

Sock Assist by Vive – Stocking Puller Assistant Aid – Compression Sock Helper Elderly, Pregnant

 

This invention helps people put on their socks without bending down.
(YouTube video by Insider)

 

 

 

This entry was posted in Assistive Technology, AT_Device, Elderly, Wearable devices. Bookmark the permalink.

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